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is a hearing and resolution and "deja vu all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this specific topic and in particular let me just title a couple of the reports i have on this. from 2002 from the former executive director from dits, which is the predecessor agency to the department of technology and proposal for management and resources. then go a couple years later the civil grand jury report looked at our technology with hospital "pot holes or possibilities" and a year later the city controller had a letter and said they needed to improve service and performance measures. after that our city analyst did a management audit into their practices and two years later a
to the doctor and all of those things. this is the way that technology can help people) distant connect with us. 75% of our users say that we work with others to provide care and support. today, ties is three years old, and we have learned a lot about lessons with the good life. our number-one lesson is that no one should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers -- why we did pay attention to this, constantly reaching out in creating our own networks, keeping them informed is one major reason, there are more and more of us living alone. 40% of people over 60 live alone. we are more vulnerable in terms of how we are living and we are more vulnerable because those of us are living with chronic and complex diseases. that can lead and capacity to it is a very positive thing to do. what we might think of as our desire is for the company and so on, our health is a social affair. our health is intimately tied with our connections and support. when we have a good network around us, we heal more quickly, we live longer. and when we are isolated, it impacts
done at department of technology and tough economic times and the fact of the matter is your department has been subjected to the lion's share of budget cuts we were forced to do and not asking departments to make similar cuts in their it situation and i think that is part of the tension and why we shouldn't know been able to make headway. you allude to the fact until you get direction from the top about need of centralization you had to form partnerships and you as the head of department of technology can't tell other heads to cooperate and you have to work out and partnership. one of the things that i wished the grand jury spent more time on. this is the trend we're seeing in agencies and governments around the country. by in large most governments have a growing decentralization and we know we're not doing that for everything but there are functions that need to be decentralized and we know there are successes here in california and the state is expected to save $3 billion. denver went through a great consolidation and saving millions of dollars. what are those entities doing that
down to partnerships and i think department of technology and cio and coit we spend time creating these partnerships and the consolidation project is a great one. i also want to acknowledge the airport and the emergency management center and we have a great partnership with. we have a great partnership with labor and reclassify it positions and training program whereas in the past it was done on a department by department basis so i think we're creating those partnerships for success, but i think at the end of the day it's a transitional challenge for the organization to go from thinking of itself as minicorporations as they view themselves at times in independent departments to work together as a cohesive unit. it just grew up. we started in the main frame days and monolithic and those terminals and pc revolution game and it was different overnight and everyone had a pc and the expert on how to work things so we are looking for a balance. we are bringing your own device to work and still balance that and what does it make sense to have centralized and do from a security confi
of technology's function and dt adequately communicates with other departments and alleviate their barriers to performance and i gather from other agencies this will be implemented and while the audit will be helpful it is my understanding this is under way. recommendation number four -- >> excuse me. through the chair, president chiu, i think in terms what is required for responses to the recommendations there are four categories of responses. either has been implemented, has not been implemented but will be implemented. for that we need a time frame for the implementation of the recommendation requires further analysis, that requires description of the scope and time frame not exceeding six months and lastly -- [inaudible] >> my understanding is this will be implemented but the six month time frame is appropriate if that is something we're required to do. >> okay. so for will be implemented -- yes. as long as there is a time frame. >> okay. i will use that as a default, for time period for coit and department of technology to work with this on the budget analyst or controller. for
frame. >> okay. i will use that as a default, for time period for coit and department of technology to work with this on the budget analyst or controller. for finding four and appoint two members without delay. from my understanding will be implemented and while the city has not moved on it for six months i expect this to be. >> >> six years i expect the city to work on this and get it done in the next six months or six weeks. next is have a plan and budget and reviewed by coit and to the mayor's office and the board of supervisors. again what is fascinating about the answers and all of the agencies are across the map. some say yes. some say no. some say it's implemented. some say it's not. it will be implemented and always a cit budget but not decisions related to that budget. recommendation number six. subject to coit approval of the i kr.d t budget and staffing plans coit and the cio must monitor adherence to these plans and i think what i will say for this should be implemented within the next six months. one of the challenges we face challenges here at the board and
civil service for technology. it reduces time to hire. it raises proakt of attracting top talent. it means hiring mistakes can be corrected easily. it's done elsewhere in the city. lawyers and our attorney departments do have at will status for the same reasons as we find with technology. isn't it worth the effort to match talent with what is needed? culture is a mighty force. it provides comfort in it's traditions. it's a safe haven u because it's tried and accepted. it's reinforced because it's troublesome to change but culture all blinds to the other ways of doing things evening if the other ways hint of doing better. it stifles and shuts down i thinking. it doesn't anticipate the unintended consequences of changing times. this grand jury is not the only voice that called more direct relationship between the city cio and budget leaders or a budget plan or urged reform to technology practices so they match the dynamic technology world, or any of the other recommendations in our report, but the way things are done around here is so embedded in san francisco government
urged reform to technology practices so they match the dynamic technology world, or any of the other recommendations in our report, but the way things are done around here is so embedded in san francisco government culture that the potential benefits to the san francisco community that have been raised, not just by us, are more than ignored. they are mocked by a city administration fearing change. we believe that only the mayor can make the changes that we and others have proposed. no one else has the direct authority over government operations than he has. he can do it if he is willing to put the passionate leadership he puts in attracting tech business to the city and improving the organization and technology within san francisco government. perhaps we have to wait for a different administration for there to be a fair hearing on ways to improve technology. perhaps you, the board of supervisors, can take up this challenge. we hope you will. there was a better ending to our title report, deja vu all over again. that is "where there is a will there is a way .". than
. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have a chief innovation officer, jane, who is working in my office. he keeps a good connection for both me and them members of the board of supervisors to share in what are the technologies and what they're doing in san francisco and what the latest discoveries are that we can possibly use to help improve our city. finally, as someone you know, i celebrated my 60th birthday last week. [applause] and my staff gave me an ipad, and is looking at it -- i might have to go and join your classes to be able to appreciate all the applications that we have there. so do not be surprised if the guy next to you has a mustache. when i leave here this morning, i will be g
is not just about technology, it is about a spirit of being willing to solve problems for a larger (inaudible) that is what i have always kept as a close objective. my role in government. so it is with that i wanted to thank the number of people here, first and foremost, ted (inaudible) and america, and just this place, (inaudible) america that has been really very helpful to insight a lot more innovative spirit in everybody and i said what is your passion? and how can we get people who share that same passion to break the barriers of either the lack of technology or education level to really work together to collaborate even further. and so, we were... service, and we are (inaudible) america next year to become partner and tackle the issues that we have been struggling with in government. i also want to thank, mike (inaudible) he is here. mike is the head of a city hall fellows for quite some years. and in fact, i think that he is responsible for some set of (inaudible) of students that come through the city since 2008 helping us and helping the department solve problems and being additional
though i really like media and technology i didn't know there was a career path for it. everybody kept on telling me you should be a doctor, a lawyer because that's where the money is. the usual thing that parents say. it seemed to me you really have to be very lucky and hard working like a steven speilburg or end up video taping weddings which i have done and there is nothing wrong with. so in community college i finally decided to take a video production course which lead me to pursue a degree in broadcasting and i just dove in. my first semester at san francisco state i realized i would need some real world experience, and so i applied and was accepted into the internship at bay cat and i never left so i am still there. i learned so much there, not just the technical skills, but also soft skills needed to get hired in any work place. i love the work so much so i chose to stay on and i'm going to be a volunteer just to be able to learn the advance production skills and help the next generation of interns, so after graduating from college at sf state they offered me a job. they w
technology industry and when ron conway. ron just arrived and got out of at&t together. we worked together and had a personal agreement if we were as a city were to help technology we were going to have technology help us, so less than two years later when i first started the unemployment rate in san francisco was 9.6% and last friday we flipd that number in less than two years. [applause] lead my all the industries but most importantly by our technology industry. over 14,000, to 15,000 jobs were technology sector alone so it's right for us to make sure our future, our kids, our returning veterans, our people in their mid-career of their jobs now have an opportunity to really join in this job creating effort, and i still will say it's the private sector working with city government that's going to create the newest jobs for generations to come. today as part of the ongoing month of orange, month of innovation it's not only a celebration we all declared it innovation month and we wanted to make this announcement today about the steps we're taking for the on going work of tech sf and again
, this is part of our broadband technology grant, the average cost is zero. [laughter] if you were to buy this for your home, it costs a couple of hundred dollars. the games cost between $20.40 dollars. they have hundreds of different games to play. to the games cost between $20.40 dollars. and hundreds of different games to play. we have other adaptive devices that can be used with the wii. this is a foot pedal. -- this is a foot pedal. along with the buttons on the hand device connected to alicia's remote, we can use foot pedals if there are games the require numerous controls. it is very adaptive. then, really interesting. what about someone who may be a quadriplegic and does not have the ability to use arms or legs? there is a sip and tug adapter that allows someone to control the wii with his or her mouth. you can still engaged the wii by puffing into the tube. this company has made the wii completely accessible for anyone to play. it is a great option. if you want more information about the adaptive equipment for the wii, visit alicia's booth. >> i work for the independent living ce
technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk mckenzie also said this, while tens of th
shreks after that. dreamworks animation may be a studio but it's a technology company as well, and mit's technology review named dreamworks as one of the most innovative companies in the world. but as the stature grows, so too does the pressure. investors would like to see them expand beyond the two films a year. their next movie hits box offices next year. >> the tooth fairy. i knew you'd come. >> lincoln wallin is the new chief technology officer at dreamworks animation. aside from the animators themselves there's probably no more important position there, joined by martin giles of the economist. as you guys are developing the new technology, i know computers are moving faster and better, i know that the hair in the character is going to be, you know, easier to see and more refined. so that's out of the way. what else is new? what else is interesting in the digital animation world? >> i think that's a great question. computers are getting powerful, more powerful. but the way they're getting more powerful is quite unique. they're not just getting faster. you are getting more computers
to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go
, you have got to see the magic mirror, that is something that is going to blend technology with your fashion. mr. yuni on behalf of the city in a way in which we are so proud, so thankful for this opportunity to welcome the flag ship here, we would like to declare this unico day here in san francisco. [ applause ] >> thank you, very much. mayor lee and thank you very much everyone. i think that we are ready now to spread the unico ribbon for the ribbon-cutting ceremony, yes? if we could have, here we go, just underneath, yes, please. yes, i think that everyone has, yes, thank you very much. so, ladies and gentlemen, we are going to do it on the count of three. we will go, 3, 2, 1 for our guests and for our executives, obviously we have a number of very interested photographers here so please give us your best unico smile possible. ladies and gentlemen, so if we are ready, 3, 2, 1, all right? >> 3, 2, 1... [ cheers ] >> thank you very much, everyone. and i think that we will be opening in probably... >> yes? >> we will be opening very, very shortly. one moment please. >> san francisco
in technology and industry alone. unemployment dropped from 9.6 when i started to 7.4 percent, third lowest in the state, and i said in other jurisdictions, i'll say it again, i think we contribute to marin and san mateo because we buy all the wine up north for all of our hotels and it's our airport that's keeping san mateo no. 1. so thank you very much for understanding that. but also to translate, that means 22,,000 or 25,000 san franciscoans are back to work and according to our federal labor department for the metropolitan area and just this area alone, we are the no. 1 job creator in the nation. no. 1 in san francisco. that's a credit to all of you. (applause). in commercial real estate we have experienced the strongest absorption rate since 1988, according to the 2011 data. this year we're looking to even best ourselves. we've got 78,000 square feet of positive absorption to date and forecasters are telling us to anticipate 1 1/2 to 2 million square feet by the end of this year. you don't need me to tell you how successful you are. just look around at all the cranes. in fact, i t
of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from
with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations c
, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> a look now at technology and entrepreneurship from a recent conference in detroit held at wayne state university. speakers include aol founder steve case, tim draper. former u.s. chief information officer. this is about two hours. >> thank you so much for getting us started. thank you all for being here. it's really exciting to finally have this thing and we. we've been working on for an awfully long time. what we do at techonomy is mostly up to now it's been sort of retreat like invitation only, leaders thing in the desert and i would really want to get our message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there's some messages that are just not sufficiently understood. and that's what you, i hope you will be hearing throughout the day today. and the message is, these events are focused on four issues. u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth, which is adequate to the first to come and then the revival of our cities with detroit as case study number one.
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
of the board, my name is chris connelly. part of our mission is to make sure that as new technology comes along that people don't have to choose between using the new technology and keeping their privacy. we are pleased to hear that mtc is taking action that clipper action, although not as precise as information from a cell phone, can reveal a lot about a individual. it can reveal if you got on or off bart near a hospital, near a clinic, all sorts of things that may imply things about your personal life and particularly over a long period of time there is an extensive amount of information collected about a person. are they going to church on a regular basis. are they going to baseball games when they are supposed to be at work? i think it is important to recognize that these records should be respected, should be treated as private information and as the commission said, should be looked at and retained only as long as necessary for operational purposes, not because it's cheap to retain data but because you need them for fraud. i'd like to demonstrate to the committee, this is an app
to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo. today coming to you live from the jpmorgan ceo technology summit. lots to talk about here. the fiscal cliff clearly remaining a hot button issue and a market driver. did the president's remarks on that today blunt the rally? we're taking a look. then we've got some heavy hitters lined up for you to talk about that, including former treasury secretary larry summers. he'll be with me in a few moments. we'll talk about strategy coming out of the white house today and what he thinks the president should do. later, it's the big interview of the day. my exclusive one on one with jpmorgan chase ceo jamie dimon. you'll want to hear what he thinks about budget crisis, what needs to be done to fix it, and the banking sector. bill. >> well, i'm bill griffeth. we can't wait to hear what jamie dimon has to say about the fiscal cliff. it's the talk of the day. based on wall street's reaction to what president obama and house speaker boehner had to say earlier today, it is clear that investors are not expecting a quick fix. look at the major averages, which are lower s
barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you. i am really pleased to be up here -- well, not really, but you're so pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch -- i am pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch. as you know, this is the middle of a process to train and teach more people how to use computers. we wanted to showcase a little bit of what folks are learning out there. first, we will show a video, and then wind up -- linda will explain about lunch. i know a few people have slipped over there, but i ask everyone to be quiet for a few minutes. there is plenty to go around. the video we're goin
a lot of panels up there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there is new technology coming out all the time. we have been challenged in the solar technology arena because traditional technology has heavy weight technology that always challenged the integrity of roof tops, and moscone is the one we found and let that be for one of these companies and light ultralight technology and use, cheaper way of getting solar out there and we're going to allow them to demonstrate their product on top of our mos connie roof and that is an example we're doing in utilizing all of the agency's cooperations and make sure the start ups can use real testing sites in the city. that is thanks to the hardand kelly and the manager at puc and barbara hale and the second thing we're going to do is take a page out of what we're doing with clean tech and biotech life sciences. you see what mission bay is doing. they have for the last ten years building up a ecosystem of pharmaceutical companies and san francisco medical center and integrated around with the research teams to form a very strong res
that there are cheaper technological solutions to our national security problem and the most obvious exponents of this is drones and other remote wrote -- invading a country, you can just the public perceives and many of thes received drone along its border. there's a fascinating strategic conversation about whether that is correct and will work out over time. there's also as anyone who has worked in this field knows, the fact that technology is rather expensive and that also justifies the need for an endless growing budget if your security is completely dependent on keeping your high tech offense ahead of both lower tech defense your adversaries will navigate against you. so technology is put forward and believed by the public to be a budget panacea but it is not. the third point that should be made about appetite is -- i would go further and say we saw in this election at the presidential level and the congressional level went across party lines and effort to make candidates pay for expressing willingness to cut pentagon spending and had zero effect and the massive infusion of corporate cont
is technology. generally technology isn't a heavily regulated industry any way. and they don't really pay a high dividend. >> the question is will we see a end of year zell selloff as toward try to lock in profits when tax rates are lower verse us next year when they go up. but how high will they go up on the dividend payers? >> right now, president obama's propose al would have dividends taxed at ordinary income. that is substantially higher tax rate than the 15% tax rate that toward are enjoying right now. either way, we think that dividend yields will ultimately get dinged. as you mentioned, they have gotten hit. they were down something like 3% and the week ending just before the election. even in anticipation of that. it's hard to know. remember, a lot of dividend stocks are held in tax-exempt accounts, 401(k)s, pensions, endowments, foundations. we are dealing with a subset here. my sense is we will not see a pull back because a lot of dividends aren't taxed to the extent you would think. >> good to have you on the program. thank you so much. >> thank you, maria. >> up next on the "wall st
text if the car is unplugged what we see is convergence of technology. foreign is part of the ownership experience of a vehicle. >>reporter: smart phone integrate is a big deal for ford ford competitor general motors they make the involvement folks on a budget general motors is trying something a little different. little describes the chevy spark. so-called city car that gets 38 miles gallon the gas engine or around 13,000 dollars. even at that price it has the touch screen designed with one audience in mine. >> young urban item. so customers having the first new job. buying the first place. purchasing their first new vehicle. >>reporter: keep the price down gm left out a lot of the fancy electronic this uses the smart phone as the brain. >> all of this is working off the smart phone. the minute i unplug my phone l it's no longer going to be displayed on the screen. >>reporter: all electric spark is due out next year. in san francisco, abc 7 news. >> well still coming up tonight on 7 news at 9:00. we show you some of the latest technology to arrive in silicon valley. gunman st
thousands of more jobs, creating an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want t
to manhattan, kansas. >> may know more about technology than a tomcat's knows about baking gingerbread. >> welcome to our viewers. israel killed the military commander of hamas and launched a series of attacks. hamas vowed in this would open the gates to hell. military action will continue. >> for the people of gaza, it looked like a war, and as in most wars, civilians are caught up in the violence. the first target today was the biggest hamas's most senior military leader was typify and -- hit by a military strike. he died instantly. hamas says this is a major provocation. good >> they will pay a price for this, because he was one of our most exceptional leaders. >> she sat at the top of the military wing. tonight israel published these images. the army released video footage of him being tracked and the moment when his car was hit. israel said the strike followed a wave of rocket attacks from gaza. >> i can just elaborate the target was to protect israeli civilians. they have been under constant rocket attacks for the last year. >> gaza is expected to face more casualties, among them
president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green products and jobs that yet to we cannot define what a green job it is. that has five definitions of the green job as a discounted. energy from renewable sources. energy efficiency. energy pollution reduction in removal. natural resource conservation. environmental compliance education and training and public awareness. when i was testifying on capitol hill, they had a paper cup in front of me. most the time it it is just a bottle of water. it said architect of the capital and power to save energy on the ot
by the international energy agency comes as new technologies opens up huge oil reserves underground. the iea said u.s. oil output will surpass that of saudi arabia and other countries by 2017. the u.s. has established technology to extract shale oil from hard rock layers thousands of meters below the ground. commercial production has already begun. the agency says the u.s. will be nearly self-sufficient by 2035. that's due to an expected surge in the production of shale gas, a type of natural gas also trapped in underground rock. america currently relies on imports for 20% of energy needs. once the u.s. achieves successful sufficiency in energy, it may start showing less interest in oil producing regions including the middle east. >>> let's check on the markets. the u.s. markets changed little overnight. trading volume was low as other markets as long as the u.s. bonds market was closed for veterans day. and to see how stocks in japan are doing, we go to ramin mellegard at the tokyo stock exchange. how are things kicking off over there? >> good morning to you. yes, indeed. still a bit of hesitation
of america. we also live in the technology center of what is going on in the nation and maybe the world. we really wanted to draft off the modern cleanliness of those companies, of google, twitter, apple, yahoo!, facebook. probably forget someone. they are fueling the economy, we want to draft off that. that makes this interesting. we added a hash tag to the name. no one's done that. we want the bay area -- i guess there are 8 million, maybe more or maybe less, we want them all to participate. by this logo it says come on, let's show the nfl we are in this together that. is pretty much it. [applause] >> short and sweet. thank you, rich silverstein. listen, the ceo of the 9ers is here. obviously this is not happening if the 9ers are not building a state-of-the-art, brand-new facility. we are excited to see it. it is going up fast. will it be ready in time for super bowl 50. we hope we have the honor of hosting it. mr. york. [applause] >> it is a pleasure to be here and bid for super bowl 50. the last time there was a super bowl in northern california i wasn't quite 4 years old. you have sup
, but how we get a lot of voices in, and maybe technology is an answer here. i am a big fan. >> [inaudible] i would love to hear from each one of you with the city could do in terms of regulation to help your businesses. we talked about the tax issue. what with each of you say is an issue the city could help with. >> i will start. one thing we would like to see is to make parking easier. we want it to be as easy to share your car as possible, and if you when your car and the renter cannot find a parking spot, that is an issue we need to solve. there are actually great models from around the world in terms of on street parking or some sort of system to not only encourage car owners to share, but also not discourage people from using private car sharing because parking is an issue. we have been piloting this a little bit, and we hope to actually see something come out around parking. obviously, the other issues we have discussed impact any of the schering economy companies. you could also see opportunities to educate the public or just gain awareness for the services through the city and exi
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